Posted in April 2012

In Search of a Broad, Coherent, Social Ecology

Recently, someone immersed in Murray Bookchin’s late-period works asked my definition of social ecology. This brought up an important issue. How is social ecology to be defined generally, taking the entirety of the field and its historical development into account? This implies a broad conception–one that recognizes both Bookchin’s open, early approaches, his later narrower variation, John P. Clark’s contribution, as well as antecedent and contemporary influences that continue to be discovered. Continue reading

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